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08 April 2006 @ 10:53 am
Smallville 5.17 Void  
I don't have long today so I'm just going to jot down the things I found most interesting about this ep and revisit it later.

Visions
A Lana-centric episode was not what I was expecting or hoping for at this stage in the season, but I found Void very gripping. Lana, Lex and Clark each see their parents. Clark asserts the 'reality' of the vision, that it was really Jonathan he saw, not, as Chloe puts it, a 'manifestation of desires and fears'. Lana and Lex similarly seem to completely believe in the reality of their vision parents. It's important that they do so, or the visions would not have the power over them that they do. However as audience members we can see to what degree these figures really do function as manifestations of desires and fears. We can see how the characters blind themselves. It is interesting to compare the three visions to see what they reflect about the characters' internal landscapes at this point in time.

Physical context
Lana's parents appear in an abstract space. Lex wakes up in front of the fire, a place I've long speculated represents his longing for connection and intimacy with others. The room is dark but candlelit, and he connects with his mother via the piano. Clark wakes up in the barn--not in the loft, but in the space he shared with Jonathan. But he's alone--he has inherited the space. Jonathan enters flooding the place with light, but ultimately thrusts Clark back into the barn.

This reflects the relationships of each of the characters. Lana is placeless in a sense--without the Talon these days, she's the most uprooted of all the characters. In a show where each character has traditionally had a physical 'space' of their own, Lana is missing that anchorage. Lex's present world is linked to his mother through the physical memento of the piano, something he is able to use to reconnect with her memory. The fire implies the ways her absence creates a void that he tries to fill through intimacy with others. Clark is battling with inheriting his father's role (and space). Although he is 'at home' in the barn, he wants Jonathan to be there too, but he has to face that he's alone now.

Emotional connection
The behaviour of each character's parents is strikingly different. Chloe points out that Lana is seeking out the two people who love her unconditionally, and this is borne out in what we see in her vision. Absent parents, those that have died, can easily be romanticised as the 'everloving' figure. Lana lost her parents very young, she has very little to remember of them, and it's not surprising that all she sees is the love and bliss and physical connection that she never had.

Lex's experience could not be more different. Lillian is almost a threatening, punishing figure in his vision, rebuking him for not following her advice the last time he had his near death experience. She appears as a far more emotionally manipulative figure than we've ever seen her before. Gone is the idealised 'perfect mother' whose memory Lex defended and protected from Lionel for so many years. She reflects, far more now, Lex's internalised fears and guilt. And she has a dark, dark message--that Lex will murder (her words drawing on the imagery we have already seen of fields of shrivelling flowers, and blood raining from heaven). The complexity and darkness of Lex's vision reflects both the circumstances under which Lillian died and where Lex is at in his own life.

Clark's relationship with Jonathan is similarly more complex than Lana's vision. He quickly uses the connection as an opportunity to express his fears and seek forgiveness. Jonathan has a comforting message: the old 'it's not your fault son' and 'you have a destiny'. While it's understandable that Clark would envision Jonathan saying these things, like Lex's vision, Clark's goes further than he could have consciously expected. Jonathan describes Clark as a symbol of peace and justice, and tells him that Lionel knows everything. He goes further than ever before in pushing Clark into his future role. In this way, Clark's vision is more like Lex's--it explores fears and guilt, and ends with a parent figure describing the iconic figure he will become.

But Jonathan also tells Clark that he 'does not belong' in the world of the dead. He physically thrusts him back into the world of the living. This is an interesting reflection on the fact that Clark may be immortal. It's also a fascinating parallel to Lillian, who toys with the idea of 'keeping Lex' in the world of the dead to protect the lives of those he will kill. If she doesn't keep him there, she says there will be 'emptiness that can never be filled'. For whom? For Lex certainly. For many others as well I suspect, perhaps including Clark and Lana.

Response
The three characters also respond differently to each of their visions. For Lana it's pure emotional longing at it's most primitve and physical. She is driven junkie-like to get back there, and it is the physical contact with her parents that she longs for. She admits poignantly to Clark that she only 'almost' got to feel them. That's Lana's tragedy. She also confronts that she feels alone, and in one of her most telling character statements ever says that she has felt alone for a long time, even in the company of others, even with Clark.

Although Lana denies that she sought out the death experience because of the break-up with Clark, I think she is aware that there's a connection between her loneliness and her need to 'fill the void' by finding another intimate relationship. She tells Clark she'll never be that dependent again (and I think we all hope that that's true!). Whether consciously or not, each of these three have sought to fill the void of absent parents by turning to loved ones--to each other. I've explored elsewhere the way Clark and Lex function as parent figures to each other. And Lana's longing for unconditional love from a boyfriend also stems from parental absence.

Lex is far more guarded against the emotional power of the experience. He immediately calls his rational powers to work, remembering that he was injected, and asserting that he's experiencing an illusion. He distances himself intellectually from the experience, yet inevitably gets drawn in. He initially wants to get back to life, but just when he hears his mother's terrifying message, at the point when he most wants to stay, is thrust back into life against his will.

Clark, as we have seen, also wanted to stay for longer to explore his feelings. He feels he can't do it without Jonathan--it's not surprising that he's still working through these feelings since Jonathan passed away only recently. For Clark though, the experience leads to a very immediate course of action. He seeks out his mother to tell her about Lionel and is met with the chilling vision of her leaving on Lionel's arm for a ball.

Lex also received a message from his vision, but unlike Clark he hides it from the person closest to him. He lies to Lana, telling her that his mother is proud of him. It's a lie that Lana buys completely because it's so like her own vision. Her's is the most naïve and childlike of all three, but that's not surprising considering that her parents died when she was so young.

Mirror
Last week I discussed how Lana and Lex function as mirrors for each other, and this week again we saw that explored. Lex understands the appeal for Lana of the near-death experiences, but compels her to 'look at herself'. He is able to empathise completely with her, in a way that Clark never could. And they continue to be paralleled. Without Clark, Lana turns into a criminal figure. She hurts those she loves, shying away from Chloe, and steals to get what she most desires. Lex too, was plunged into this sort of void in the absence of parental love and experiencing Clark's rejection. Most fascinatingly of all, the consequences of Lex and Lana both being pulled back into life are that they will kill people. Lana faces this far quicker that Lex, killing the med-student in quite a gruesome manner.

Final notes
It was great to see Martha's return to strength. I'm delighted that she's become a senator, and it was great to see her in action. I also loved that she cut Lionel down by calling him on the fact he may be motivated by wanting something personal from their relationship. Yet despite her 'attack to defend' approach, Lionel is smoothly working his way into her life.

I also love that it was Lionel that tipped Chloe off about Fine--nice web of connections there. And I guessed that one early in the ep. Lionel is such a player--it had to be him.

On a more flippant note, I know nothing about Honduras but I'm fairly sure it's more than just one village. How the hell did Clark know where to go? *lol*

Ok, sorry about any typos! Got to fly. Will be fascinated to read other people's thoughts on my return.
 
 
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Nora Norwichnorwich36 on April 8th, 2006 03:15 am (UTC)
space and place
I'm going out of town this weekend, so if when you get a chance to start responding to comments/reading your flist and I'm not replying, that's why, just fyi.

I really liked your observations about the physical settings of the different visions: Lana is placeless in a sense--without the Talon these days, she's the most uprooted of all the characters. In a show where each character has traditionally had a physical 'space' of their own, Lana is missing that anchorage. Lex's present world is linked to his mother through the physical memento of the piano, something he is able to use to reconnect with her memory. The fire implies the ways her absence creates a void that he tries to fill through intimacy with others. Clark is battling with inheriting his father's role (and space). Although he is 'at home' in the barn, he wants Jonathan to be there too, but he has to face that he's alone now.

I had thought it was interesting that each "afterlife" (at least as the show seemed to be framing it) started out in a space that was familiar to the character, but I really like your observations about starting in their own space. And I do think it is interesting that Lex and Clark start from their own space--the barn has been coded as Clark's from the beginning of the series--while as you said, Lana lacks a space of her own, which is another void that needs to be filled in this episode.

I also liked your observations about the fireplace representing intimacy for Lex, because it's not just intimacy, is it? It's failed intimacy. Just about every fireplace scene Lex has ever had was with a woman who has later betrayed him. Is this now how he sees Lillian?

I agree with you (and latxcvi that all the visions can be read as unconscious projections, though I'm not sure that's the most apparent reading. And if you read them as visions of the afterlife, I think it is deeply significant that Lillian is framed in darkness while Jonathan is practically glowing with light. This no doubt connects to your observation about Lillian trying to keep Lex with her, in death (like Julian?) while Jonathan pushes Clark back into life.
K, Bop or Boppy--take your pick!bop_radar on April 8th, 2006 09:43 am (UTC)
Re: space and place
Yes--absolutely spot on--the fire is about failed intimacy. It's about Lex's hopes for intimacy more than their success--quite often recently he is alone at the fire. It's also interesting from Clark's pov, because he has projected a lot of fear onto that hearth and what it means (in Slumber he dreamt of Lex confronting him there, in Splinter of Lex seducing Lana there). It's as if he subliminally conscious of Lex's desire for intimacy and fears the ways in which it might expose or hurt him.

And yes, it's interesting to speculate that he may now consider Lillian as a woman who will betray him. I can understand how he would have deeply ambivalent feelings about her following Lexmas, but depending on how you read that experience, it may have begun before then.

And there's definitely different ways of reading these visions. Even at the most literal level they're interesting. The Lillian scene was terribly funereal. She's moved from being someone he longs for (re)connection with (like Julian) to someone he somehow dreads. And yet her message is supposedly positive--that he could yet choose to be good. There's a sense of inevitability that is developed from having her be so punitive and accusing in her approach. She should be a loving saviour figure, but she's far darker than that, and I can't help but read that as reflecting Lex's own complex relationship with the idea of 'good' and 'evil' now.

Jonathan pushing Clark back into life was such a powerful image!
Nora Norwichnorwich36 on April 8th, 2006 03:21 am (UTC)
Mirrors
Last week I discussed how Lana and Lex function as mirrors for each other, and this week again we saw that explored. Lex understands the appeal for Lana of the near-death experiences, but compels her to 'look at herself'. He is able to empathise completely with her, in a way that Clark never could. And they continue to be paralleled. Without Clark, Lana turns into a criminal figure. She hurts those she loves, shying away from Chloe, and steals to get what she most desires. Lex too, was plunged into this sort of void in the absence of parental love and experiencing Clark's rejection. Most fascinatingly of all, the consequences of Lex and Lana both being pulled back into life are that they will kill people. Lana faces this far quicker that Lex, killing the med-student in quite a gruesome manner.

Oh, this is brilliant. I know we've talked about the many ways Lana has been mirroring Lex this season (especially season 1 Lex), but I didn't even think of this interpretation of her behavior (though I did wonder if Lex's clear recognition of junkie Lana's behavior reflected his own earlier experiences). I love this reading of Lana's turn to criminality as reflecting Lex's.

And yeah, I think this week Lana's direct body count officially surpasses Lex's!
K, Bop or Boppy--take your pick!: Lex Fallen Virtuousbop_radar on April 8th, 2006 09:53 am (UTC)
Re: Mirrors
It does! It surpasses Lex's! I love that the less observant viewer would totally miss this fact, but it's quite clear. This week's scene was really quite drawn out and she stared right at him. The Lana/Lex parallels are quite startling. I loved how Lex was just so easily able to read her. I agree that he could interpret her behaviour in the blink of an eye, and I also thought that Michael acted the scene really well, showing with body language that he understood the powerful appeal of the near-death experience, even before he said the lines. Lex is in a more mature place than Lana--he's now self-conscious about his addictive tendancies and the ways in which his dark longings could be exploited by others. And he's got a powerful message for Lana--that she can still find self-acceptance despite her own 'darkness'.

I was also flashing back to earlier, more limited, occasions when Lana has enacted rebellion (in Nicodemus for example). She stole the car then too, and Lex always met this stuff with amused understanding.

I also thought about the ways in which Lex and Clark have played different roles in empowering Lana. On the surface Lex has been the one to allow her to choose her own destiny (run the Talon, go to Paris) but he's wanted something in return emotionally. Clark, on the other hand, has been clingy and demanding for so long. Yet he's finally reached a mature place of acknowledging the abusive effect this has on Lana. Now Clark is saying he wants her to be 'free' and 'happy'. Yet we can also see Lex lurking in the wings with a supposedly empowering message about self-acceptance that could deceptively lead her into further darkness (the scene where Lex lied about Lillian was quite chilling).
Re: Mirrors - supacat on April 9th, 2006 12:38 am (UTC) (Expand)
Re: Mirrors - bop_radar on April 9th, 2006 04:20 am (UTC) (Expand)
Veral_vera01 on April 8th, 2006 05:12 am (UTC)
I couldn't quite face sitting through the whole ep -Gee, I wonder why? (G) - but I did make a point of seeing Jonathan's scene. Wasn't that whole spiel a bit much? It's like a kick-in-the-pants directing Clark into becoming a "symbol of peace and justice" or something like that. When did Jonathan start thinking like this? It sort of felt like they were trying to hurry up Superman's appearance. And if this is all in Clark's head, when did he start thinking like this?!? Sheesh! I missed it all!
K, Bop or Boppy--take your pick!: Bop_radar TWbop_radar on April 8th, 2006 09:56 am (UTC)
Aw, cute pug!

Hee. Yes--I don't buy that that was a genuine Jonathan emotion. I read that very much as Clark's projection of his own hopes/desires. I think he wants his father to tell him that he can be a good powerful figure. For so long he's feared the darkness that comes with his power--I'm not that surprised that his vision of Jonathan included him reassuring Clark that that was still possible.

And this season is very much about Clark maturing and becoming a responsible decision maker--yes, it's a bit of a jump to 'symbol of peace and justice', but I think he's getting a lot more confident about the ways he intervenes in the fate of the world.
(Deleted comment)
K, Bop or Boppy--take your pick!: Lana iconbop_radar on April 8th, 2006 10:06 am (UTC)
Awesome icon!

I really felt for Lana by the end
Me too! I was really moved by her. We've got a very real, very honest Lana, in this episode, and I think we really see her struggle. 'Arrested emotional development' is the perfect way to describe it. She once bemoaned the fact that she felt trapped in the image on Time, of her crying in her fairy princess outfit, and for a long time that's what we explored about Lana--the way she was trapped by other people's projections. But she's also trapped internally by her own naive emotional landscape. And for once I really felt like this was not her fault--as you say, she's striving for independence. But she's not clearsighted enough (yet?) to achieve it.

It's why her line about not being dependent is so sadly ironic
Yes! True. She's professing what she wants to believe is true, but it's not true, and deep inside she knows that void is still there. Actually this prompted me to think of another parallel between her and Lex in the way they respond in the wake of these experiences--both lie to themselves/their loved one about the reality. The lies don't have quite the same quality--Lex is more consciously calculated I think--but they are both aware that what they are saying is not the real emotional truth of what they experienced.

Oh, Smallville, you don't even *try* for a pretense of reality, do you?
Hee, no! And I both love that and hate that! Yeah, Chloe's hacking abilities are a superpower in their own right. Actually, Lex's call about expensive cars having a GPS tracking system was a bizarre blast of real-life practicality in this ep. I was staggered that they actually used that for once, instead of the usual 'key character making timely appearance at scene of crime with no explanation of how they got there/knew to go there etc'.
(no subject) - rumpuso on April 8th, 2006 12:00 pm (UTC) (Expand)
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rumpuso on April 8th, 2006 11:30 am (UTC)
This is a very good discussion going on here. I really enjoy your observations, as well as those of the posters responding. I actually wrote my thoughts for this episode at SHH and thought I'd give a summation of my viewpoints from that forum over here (if that's okay).

I actually thought this was a great episode. Lana's quest to reconnect with someone who loves her was bittersweet and yet, so desperately sad. Clark's priority to find Professor Fine and the missing ship showed a great maturity in him in that he is now able to look at all his has on his plate and make appropriate choices based on levels of danger and need. I also appreciated that he is not second guessing his decision to break things off with Lana. That shows a strong sense of maturity that he has confidence in the choice he has made. He even took it a step further and reassured Lana that he only wants what is best for her. That was an important point not only for Lana to hear, but also for the viewing audience who tend to judge Clark's maturity quite often. Martha set boundaries with Lionel and that needed to be done for Lionel's clarity and for the viewers of the show. I also LOVED seeing "take-charge" Martha at the press conference in the Talon. Very apt characterization for her which pulled from her prior working experience before she met Jonathan and also from her time working as Lionel's assistant. Clark's victimization from the k-shot and subsequent Jonathan vision was really well played out. It was so good to see Jonathan embrace Clark physically, and emotionally one more time. Of all the visions from this k-shot experience (i.e. Lana not quite reaching her parents and Lex's mother giving him a comeuppance), Clark is still the one who has the deepest connection in both life and in spirituality with his parents. That just reinforces once again the reason why Clark becomes the magnificent superhero that his father professes he will be...the symbol of peace, the symbol of justice.

I thought this episode had quite a lot going for it, and it effectively set up the ongoing confliction with Brainiac, as well as Lex's further demise into dark waters as he manipulates Lana over to his *side*.
K, Bop or Boppy--take your pick!: Clex bitter endbop_radar on April 8th, 2006 11:53 am (UTC)
I actually wrote my thoughts for this episode at SHH and thought I'd give a summation of my viewpoints over here
Yes! Please do! Always good to hear from you.

I like your observation about Clark's maturity level in being able to set priorities. That's a good continuation of the growth phase he is in at the moment. That last scene between Lana and Clark was very powerful and I agree that it's important that we hear Clark articulate that he wants the best for Lana. For once I didn't feel that this was an unnecessary Clana moment.

And you rightly observe that Clark's vision reflects that of all three characters he has the deepest and most complex relationship with his absent father. I think this in part reflects when Jonathan passed away. Clark's vision of him is far more of a dialogue with a person who is still very 'real' to Clark (even if you read vision!Jonathan as a projection of Clark's subconscious). Whereas Lex's conversation with Lillian seems far more like an internal dialogue he's having with his conscience, and Lana's experience is almost pre-natal in it's simplicity (she looked like she was being ripped from the womb when she was torn back into life).

And yes, they are shifting things forward to a season climax--I am impatient to see how it plays out. Sadly I will be overseas travelling for eps 20 onwards. Such bad timing! I'm going to be pining for SV so badly. And I can't believe I'll miss all the meta-ing on LJ!
(no subject) - rumpuso on April 8th, 2006 11:58 am (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - bop_radar on April 8th, 2006 12:18 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - rumpuso on April 8th, 2006 12:35 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - bop_radar on April 9th, 2006 04:38 am (UTC) (Expand)
blowjobs for jesuskristiinthedark on April 8th, 2006 09:31 pm (UTC)
*blissful sigh* I always love your recaps so much, even when we disagree. You get things and meanings that I never do, and I appreciate that so much. That being said, I really disliked this episode, and I rarely say that when it comes to Smallville. There were just too many "what the hell?" moments for me, like with the Honduras trip when Clark appears to be flying. I think? I really can't say for sure and I find that in itself to be frustrating, because the writers need to make it clear one way or another.

On a purely shallow note, I wanted WAY more Clark. *g*
K, Bop or Boppy--take your pick!: Lex purple evilbop_radar on April 9th, 2006 04:36 am (UTC)
Awww! That's a lovely thing to say. Thank you! *g*
I thought Clark was flying for a minute there too. Then I realised that he was just running very fast. But he must be getting faster? I think someone else commented on that. It was a bit weird.

And yeah, I'd kind of been waiting for an ep where Clark wasn't in sight--it's TW's directing debut next week, so that's why he wasn't in this one much (hope that's not too spoilery for you--I didn't consider it a spoiler myself).
(no subject) - kristiinthedark on April 9th, 2006 07:00 pm (UTC) (Expand)
(no subject) - bop_radar on April 10th, 2006 02:30 am (UTC) (Expand)
Becky: Hoodie!sadface on April 9th, 2006 10:19 am (UTC)
Ah my first stop after an airing *happysigh*

I saw the fireplace and thought of you yknow. I love reading your observations (and actually find myself thinking of them during the episode like 'right, we're in Clark's space here, I really appreciate it because I can have shallow and pretty and deep too, yay!)

I had more, about Lex rejecting his experience by telling Lana his mother was proud. And about how Lana, really could probably have touched her parents if she wanted to (after all Clark's first instinct was to hug) and how this relates to her having them as distant 'untouchable' objects as opposed to people she feels true warmth from, but my sentences got all muddled and then I started thinking about the implications of 'vision' vs 'actual otherside' and how this relates to Lexmas, whether both sides are equally valid and will simply affect your reading of Lex's (mainly) character and then about the theology of Smallville (If there is an otherside, does that mean there's a God?)

and more flippantly (natch) why does mummy!Lex want to lick Lex's neck? (oh come on she did!) and is that proof that it was a subconsious manifestation?

Which reminds me, does Lex see his future in Hourglass? does he know about all these things that his mother referenced?

Then my little head exploded and im going to lunch, I shall think about it then and try and have an answer to my stupid amount of questions, or you could answer them for me, as you is smart.

*is thinky this weekend*
K, Bop or Boppy--take your pick!: Clex strollingbop_radar on April 9th, 2006 12:30 pm (UTC)
*pats the thinky one*
I'm so charmed that you think of me during the eps--with the fireplace and Clark's space and all!

Lex rejecting his experience by telling Lana his mother was proud
That's a very interesting point to raise! Because I do think there was an element of self-denial in lying to her. Yes, the lie was calculated, but I don't think it was just about Lana. If he'd really wanted to confront the horror of his vision and deal with what it might mean, sharing it with someone would have been a good step. But he's not going to do that--to me that implies that it will continue to have subconscious power over him, even if he tries to reject its message. I'd love to read a ficionalisation of Lex's pov in that scene--I can imagine that he would be both horrified and fascinated by the vision.

Lana really could probably have touched her parents if she'd wanted to
Again, Becky, this is a great insight--I think you are right that her parents appear 'untoucheable'. She did seem very awed by them, almost standoffishly so. She didn't rush into their arms, despite her desparate longing for them. It's quite tragic, and perhaps suggests that Lana's parents exist more purely as concept than real figures. Actually, comparing the three visions, Clark has the most physical contact with his parent, and that fits the idea that he lost his father most recently so it's appropriate that to him his father is still a fully-fleshed, warm, 'real' person. Lillian is somewhere in between--both concept and real (as Lex remembers her quite vividly).

Re. Visions versus Afterlife
Yes, there is much debate on this at the moment--above, rumpuso mentioned that someone had suggested that the shadowy setting for Lillian versus the light for Jonathan implied Lillian was in Hell and J in Heaven. That literal reading didn't come spontaneously to me, and my personal view is that the writers have left it deliberately ambiguous whether the visions are A) real visitations from the Afterlife or B) manifestations of the characters' subconscious. I think it's interesting that even without real visions, absent (dead) parents have always played an important role in SV. And there's always been that blurry line between to what degree they are iconic (eg Lana's necklace was always a pretty empty symbol--it doesn't lead anywhere, it's pure memento), and to what degree they still exert 'real' influence over the character (eg Lex having access to Lillian's money was an important plotpoint). So I guess now the dual role of the absent parent as Icon and Real Person is made manifest in these visions. Long way of saying--yes, I think it's good to look at both sides, though I personally tend to explore their role as manifestation of subconscious.

Re. The Theology of Smallville
Interesting! It's amazing to me that they have kept God out of it for so long, actually. There's a lot of pseudo-religious imagery in SV, but they never have any references to church-going or to God per se. However an Afterlife would imply a God, right? It's a tricky thing because Clark himself is a God-like figure. So he poses problems for conventional theology. I don't know the comic canon on this either? Is Superman's world a Christian one? Someone else might have to answer this one I think...

does Lex see his future in Hourglass?
No, he doesn't. He asks Cassandra what she saw but she's dead. But he did have that other vision--the painfully beautiful one of destroying the Earth. Lex's ignorance about that vision is so dark--I've found it very disturbing that he doesn't know, but he secretly suspects that she saw something so horrible it killed her.

You prompt me to think about things! You should do this more often! *bg*
(Deleted comment)
Re: jumping in here ... - bop_radar on April 10th, 2006 02:34 am (UTC) (Expand)
(Deleted comment)
Re: I should add ... - sadface on April 9th, 2006 05:50 pm (UTC) (Expand)
Re: I should add ... - bop_radar on April 10th, 2006 02:40 am (UTC) (Expand)
Cris: MR-sexy thinking - b/wduskwillow on April 9th, 2006 01:33 pm (UTC)
Oh how I love reading your reviews after every episode. *happy sigh*

And I'll agree with others who thought that Lillian might be in hell. As soon as I saw different lightning in her scene I though it might be the case. Especially with her being mean to Lex. Maybe she's acting like that in hopes to scare him so he wouldn't end up there with her one day?

But Jonathan also tells Clark that he 'does not belong' in the world of the dead. He physically thrusts him back into the world of the living. This is an interesting reflection on the fact that Clark may be immortal.
Hm, very interesting, I didn't even thought of that. But it does sound like a very believable possibility.
K, Bop or Boppy--take your pick!: Lex mysterybop_radar on April 10th, 2006 02:43 am (UTC)
Yes, if you read Lillian as a real Afterlife visitation, it seems as if she's trying to scare him into good behaviour. Personally I think that's a bit of an odd approach, but then she was insane...

I found the image of Jonathan shoving Clark back into life almost against his will very powerful. Both Clark and Lex are plunged back into life against their will, with inevitable consequences that will be tragic for both of them.